TRANSLATION

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SOURCE LANGUAGES

GERMAN 

FRENCH

DUTCH

ENGLISH

 

TARGET LANGUAGES

ENGLISH 

FRENCH

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Intercultural Translation

Having lived, studied and worked in France, England, Germany and the Netherlands, I have developed a deeper understanding of each country's cultural context and current societal debates on top of linguistic knowledge. Such cultural immersions contribute to a more accurate reading of the original text, which is the first step in any translation work.

However, it is in my native tongues, English and French, that I am able to create a text that not only stays true to the original, but also communicates the content in a way that French and English speakers can relate to. The rewriting of a text to suit and make sense in a different world view constitutes the second step of translation work. This step involves more than just respecting the target language's grammatical and literary conventions: a heavy dose of cultural intuition must also be part of the process if the translated text is to come alive and reflect the complexity of its original counterpart. 

Collaborative Translation

Although the Cambridge Dictionary makes translation appear to be a very simple affair ("to change writing or speech from one language to another"), the history of Translation Studies points to a different view on the matter. Indeed, since the 18th century, the field of translation has been divided between the French and British points of view, promoting the utmost respect for the target language's conventions and author's originality respectively. 

Even within different schools of thought, translation remains a constant negotiation between fidelity and creativity as well as form and content. I find it essential to establish translation as a collaborative effort between the writer and the translator, seeing as there are as many ways of translating a text as there are grains of sand on a beach. It is therefore one of my priorities to communicate closely with clients to create a translation that is universally accurate, while respecting their unique creative vision. If you have a text that needs translating, proofreading or editing, do not hesitate to contact me to find out what approach would best suit you and your work.

Heritage Translation

Although it is a bottomless pit of information, Google is to some extent a reflection of current societal dynamics and dominant narratives. After typing "different types of translation" into the search bar, these were a few of the results that came up: financial, legal, scientific, judicial, commercial, technical, literary translation. To fill this gap in the translation world, I propose translations specialised in the field of cultural heritage. I am committed to conducting extensive background research on the original text's theme in order to use the corresponding terminology accurately and provide a translation equally rich and multi-sided. To find out more about the variety of texts and institutions included in my translation services, click here.